Fermented Pumpkin – Happy Halloween

Happy Halloween!
Hope you had a wonderful evening with loads of candy and mayhem.
We’ve been out for hours, I’m sure my baby Killer Clown had several kilos of sugar in his bucket.
I have incredibly creative neighbours. The decorations were absolutely amazing. It’s so fun to see the kids take over the streets with their friends. We lost some of them for a good 30min and after that I had a well deserved drink outside the my favorite pub together with the sugared-up kids and tipsy neighbours. Love it!

Did you get lots of extra pumpkins for decorations?
Why not make some lacto fermented pumpkin?

This is how:

Transcript:

Hi, everyone, hope you’re all well. Happy Halloween. I love Halloween. I love everything about it. The one thing is you end up, normally if you’re me, with a lot of pumpkins. And some of them like this big one we’re going to cut out and it’s going to be in the house and normally gets a little bit yucky after a while so we just have to throw them out. But these smaller ones like the onion ones and the harlequin one, they’re just for decoration and I’m not going to cut holes in that one.

                              So instead of just throwing it away, I’m going to make sort of a pumpkin fermented little sort of jammy type thing that you could use either ona raw pumpkin pie maybe or on pancakes or sometimes I eat it with a little bit of cheese. Vegan cheese or cow’s cheese. it works quite well with cheese or just with a meal. It has all the amazing friendly bacteria that we need in there and it’s also a bit of a fun because it’s going to stay orange. So it’s a nice sort of colour to add to everything else at the table.

                              So this is what you need. A small pumpkin. I’m using an onion pumpkin. That normally works quite well. You also need your filtered water and your salt, Himalayan Crystal Salt or ordinary sea salt. You normally mix one litre of water to 20 grammes of salt but this one I think needs a little bit more salt so I’m going to use 25 grammes of salt to one litre of water.

                              Also for the ferment I’m using a little bit of black tea, just a pinch. And one tablespoon of pumpkin pie spice mix. And if you don’t have the mix you could just make your own just mix up nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger and cloves. And when the whole thing has fermented I’m going to mix it up with some maple syrup, just two tablespoons of maple syrup. But that’s optional. I think it tastes a bit nicer with it but it’s completely optional.

                              You also need a Kilner jar. So I measured up the salt and I’m going to mix that together with the filtered water. So that’s our brine that we really need to keep the pumpkin submerged under water. Now I’m  cutting up the pumpkin and I’m going to remove the skin and then I’m going to let it go through the food processor because I’m too lazy but you can just use a hand grater if you want.

                              We put it all in a mixing bowl and then I put the black tea in and the pumpkin pie spices mix and then … okay and now in a sterilised Kilner jar I’m going to start packing it. Keep it really tight. Then we need the water, the brine. Mix it really well because otherwise you might end up with too little salt. The vegetable needs to be covered by salt brine at all times and also you need to leave a little bit of room for expansion.

                              For this one I’m going to use these pebbles to keep the pumpkin submerged. Put it on the kitchen counter and after three days I would taste a little bit to see if it’s done its thing. Otherwise wait until five days, after that it should be  good. When you feel it’s all done, you can mix it up with some syrup, I do, because I use this a little bit more like a jam. Then just put it in the fridge. Make sure it’s submerged in water and you can keep it in there for a really long time.

♥L

 

 

Happy Halloween!

Highwood Park Pumpkins

Me and my 8yo did our bit to make pumpkin carving history in a Chicago suburb last week.
Apparently a staggering 30,919  pumpkins were carved and lit (a handful by us) which would mean an entry in Guinness Book of Records no less!
Since I can’t make my eye balls pop out or swallow razor blades for that matter, this is the closest I will ever come to feature in that fabulous book.
♥L