Italian Korean & Vegan – Healthy eats in London


I had an early Voice-Over job in Farringdon yesterday and when I was done at around 10 a clock I decided to walk to Shoreditch just for fun and to explore London a bit more on foot. Something I normally never have time for.
I came across areas I had never seen before. So much to explore even after 25 years as a Londoner.
Right in the middle of Brick Lane (famous for its curry houses and bagels) I stumbled on the most fantastic vegan cafe specializing in Italian and Korean cuisine in the most wonderful mix! Kimchi with everything! My kind of place.
I had a generous portion of hemp hotdogs with rice and 2 types of kimchi and home-made vegan parmesan. It was so delicious!
I’m already planning what I’m having next time it is a toss-up between  Kimchi lasagna or Kimchi tortollini..
The Italian chef Marco was cooking and making me feel very welcome at the same time. VEGAN YES is a happy place filled with glorious.


Vegan Yes is 64 Brick Lane.

X L

3 Reasons Why I Adore FERMENTED FOOD


I’m obsessed with fermented foods and this is why:

1.  I’m adore the taste. I’ll take salty foods over sweet any day and fermented foods also comes with that intriguing umani flavour. No batch is exactly the same. This food is alive and kicking and you can taste that!

2. Growing and cultivating healthy bacteria brings out my inner urban farmer. Who know?! It’s so satisfying to grow “health” for your family, and It’s easy. Minimum effort, maximum result! My type of farming.

3. I end up with a large variety of probiotics. If I would only rely on probiotic supplements I would only get a limited number of species. We are just scratching the surface of the wonders of healthy bacteria. I feel safe knowing I get a large variety through my diet. Fermented vegetables also contain non-digestible carbohydrates that feeds and promote even more healthy bacteria along the way. Win Win!

Now Go Ferment! X

 

Fermented Cabbage with a Chinese Twist

Time to boost your good bacteria with an easy ferment!
I mix bog standard white cabbage with a couple of table spoons of Laoganma black bean chili sauce. A Sichuan style condiment full of umami flavour. The result is quite special and I’m completely obsessed !

Holiday tip:
Adding fermented foods before going to foreign lands can be a great insurance against holiday tummy. I also bring a good probiotic as an extra precaution.

X L

Fermentation for Beginners Step-By-Step

Hi all!
This is a very simple How-To Fermentation Video. No bells and whistles just a pure minimalistic ferment to get you started for a healthy, happy gut!

Don’t forget to subscribe to my YouTube channel!

Thank you! XXX

What Salt To Use When Fermenting Vegetables

Salt – the Worlds most popular seasoning can make a dish sing. The days when people shunned salt like the plague are thankfully over, but we still need to be vigilant. Not all salts are equal. Bog standard table salt is still the bad guy! It’s been chemically produced, bleached and is devoid of nutrients.
Natural Salt on the other hand is really good for us. Sean Salt, Celtic
salt or Himalayan crystal salt are all good salts. That has a place in healthy eating.

When it comes to FERMENTING it’s very important that you use the right kind os salt.
You should not use a salt with iodine as Iodine kills bacteria. Of course when we ferment we want the good bacteria to grow and flourish.

Salt is our friend when fermenting, because harmful bacteria can’t tolerate much salt but our helpful healthy bacteria can!
So the salt acts as bouncers keeping the riff raff out while our healthy bacteria get to work. The salt tolerating lactobacillus thrive and multiply.

When fermenting I like to use fine salt (sea salt or Himalayan salt) as it will be easier to work and you will quickly reach the salinity that is needed for your lactobacillus to thrive and keep the nasty bacteria at bay.

The salt does not preserve the vegetables, using more salt will not make it safer. Submerging the vegetables in the brine is what makes it safe.  The salt just gives the friendly bacteria the upper hand.

When fermenting try to stick to 1.5% ratio of veg weight. But some recipes demand a much larger % of salt.

♥L

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Recipe: Fermented Cabbage with Lemon and Thyme

Hi! People around me have been really ill this autumn and winter. One after one they have succumb to flu, pneumonia and nasty colds. Not once have I picked up any of them and I’m sure it’s due eating at least 1/2 cup of fermented vegetables a day and drinking a small glass of either water kefir or kombucha every day. It is so easy to ferment at home, sure you need a little bit of patience, but you are growing your own healthy bacteria and they need a bit of time to flourish. More and more research points to the importance of healthy gut flora. I’m convinced we will see even more breakthroughs in this area in the coming years.

♥L

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Healthy Eats – London: High Mood Food

Several ferments, kombucha, kefir and my favorite fermenting book on the shelf (The art of fermentation by Sandor Katz).
High Mood Food is my kind of cafe!
I use to trek down to Chelsea to visit the Pop up , but now  High Mood Food got a permanent home opposite Selfridges.
This is a healthy cafe focused on fermented foods.
If you are new to gut friendly fermented foods and drinks this is the perfect place to dip your toe in the culture pond before you dive in and start your own little probiotic factory in your kitchen.
As I always have a couple of tablespoons of fermented foods with my meals at home, I’m really pleased  I can now get my fix when I grab a quick lunch in town.
Both flexitarians and vegans are well catered for. Everything is colourful and delicious and the staff is super friendly. I think I got a new favorite spot.



♥L

MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL: http://www.youtube.com/lisagusto
FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM @lisagusto
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Spirulina, Cauliflower and Cabbage Ferment

Fermenting your own vegetables is so easy and cheap! With so many people being ill at the moment, this ferment is boosted with health promoting Spirulina. I don’t like the taste of Spirulina normally but when it’s been fermented together with other vegetables the taste mellows and that sharp Spirulina taste disappear and just add an interesting layer of flavoring. Win Win!

Isn’t the colour gorgeous?!

♥L

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Spicy Pumpkin Soup with Vegan Cheese and Fermented Pumpkin

As a last hurrah for Halloween and hello Bonfire Night I’ve made a delicious Spicy Pumpkin Soup, topped with Fermented Pumpkin (HERE) and Vegan Cheese.
This is a great way to eat your
Halloween decorations now it’s all but over.
I have put all the spiders, rats, ghouls and  rapping skeletons  in their boxes and I’m left with loads of small pumpkins. (The larger carved pumpkins have been binned). The smaller ones are great for cooking.

Spicy Pumpkin Soup with Vegan Cheese and Fermented Pumpkin Topping

– I small pumpkin I used a harlequin Pumpkin about 450g when peeled and de-seeded.

– 1 large carrot cut into pieces

– 2 celery sticks

– 1 small red onion

– leek about 35g

– fresh ginger 10g

– 2 garlic cloves

– 2 tablespoons coconut oil

– 1 tablespoon bouillon powder

– 1/2 tablespoon curry powder

– 1/4 teaspoon cumin

– 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon

– 500ml water

Topping – optional

– grated vegan cheese

– 1/2 tablespoon fermented pumpkin per person (when using the fermented pumpkin in the soup I normally don’t mix it with maple syrup as it’s not needed)

– pumpkin seeds

DIRECTIONS:

1. Pre heat the oven to 190C
2. Peel and de-seed your pumpkin.
3. Cut your pumpkin into pieces and mix with 1 tablespoon with coconut oil and let it roast for about 40 min or until soft.
4. Add 1 tablespoon coconut oil to a pan and add first union and then all the other veg. When soft add the spices. Last add the roasted pumpkin.
5. Add the water and the stock powder. Let it simmer for about 5-10min.
6. Use a hand mixer and mix until smooth.
7. Serve  and top with a tablespoon of fermented pumpkin, grated vegan cheese and pumpkin seeds.

♥L

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Fermented Pumpkin – Happy Halloween

Happy Halloween!
Hope you had a wonderful evening with loads of candy and mayhem.
We’ve been out for hours, I’m sure my baby Killer Clown had several kilos of sugar in his bucket.
I have incredibly creative neighbours. The decorations were absolutely amazing. It’s so fun to see the kids take over the streets with their friends. We lost some of them for a good 30min and after that I had a well deserved drink outside the my favorite pub together with the sugared-up kids and tipsy neighbours. Love it!

Did you get lots of extra pumpkins for decorations?
Why not make some lacto fermented pumpkin?

This is how:

Transcript:

Hi, everyone, hope you’re all well. Happy Halloween. I love Halloween. I love everything about it. The one thing is you end up, normally if you’re me, with a lot of pumpkins. And some of them like this big one we’re going to cut out and it’s going to be in the house and normally gets a little bit yucky after a while so we just have to throw them out. But these smaller ones like the onion ones and the harlequin one, they’re just for decoration and I’m not going to cut holes in that one.

                              So instead of just throwing it away, I’m going to make sort of a pumpkin fermented little sort of jammy type thing that you could use either ona raw pumpkin pie maybe or on pancakes or sometimes I eat it with a little bit of cheese. Vegan cheese or cow’s cheese. it works quite well with cheese or just with a meal. It has all the amazing friendly bacteria that we need in there and it’s also a bit of a fun because it’s going to stay orange. So it’s a nice sort of colour to add to everything else at the table.

                              So this is what you need. A small pumpkin. I’m using an onion pumpkin. That normally works quite well. You also need your filtered water and your salt, Himalayan Crystal Salt or ordinary sea salt. You normally mix one litre of water to 20 grammes of salt but this one I think needs a little bit more salt so I’m going to use 25 grammes of salt to one litre of water.

                              Also for the ferment I’m using a little bit of black tea, just a pinch. And one tablespoon of pumpkin pie spice mix. And if you don’t have the mix you could just make your own just mix up nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger and cloves. And when the whole thing has fermented I’m going to mix it up with some maple syrup, just two tablespoons of maple syrup. But that’s optional. I think it tastes a bit nicer with it but it’s completely optional.

                              You also need a Kilner jar. So I measured up the salt and I’m going to mix that together with the filtered water. So that’s our brine that we really need to keep the pumpkin submerged under water. Now I’m  cutting up the pumpkin and I’m going to remove the skin and then I’m going to let it go through the food processor because I’m too lazy but you can just use a hand grater if you want.

                              We put it all in a mixing bowl and then I put the black tea in and the pumpkin pie spices mix and then … okay and now in a sterilised Kilner jar I’m going to start packing it. Keep it really tight. Then we need the water, the brine. Mix it really well because otherwise you might end up with too little salt. The vegetable needs to be covered by salt brine at all times and also you need to leave a little bit of room for expansion.

                              For this one I’m going to use these pebbles to keep the pumpkin submerged. Put it on the kitchen counter and after three days I would taste a little bit to see if it’s done its thing. Otherwise wait until five days, after that it should be  good. When you feel it’s all done, you can mix it up with some syrup, I do, because I use this a little bit more like a jam. Then just put it in the fridge. Make sure it’s submerged in water and you can keep it in there for a really long time.

♥L